The History Of The “Strong Black Woman” – Dul-Sayin’ | The Daily Social Distancing Show

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Published on February 24, 2021

Dulcé Sloan investigates the stereotype of the “Strong Black Woman” to see where it comes from, why it’s harmful, and who can help her move a damn couch. #DailyShow #DulcéSloan #StrongBlackWoman

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17 comments

  • Stefani King 2 years ago

    Help her! Amen

    Reply
  • Lauren L 2 years ago

    Yeah watch it DARIUS

    Reply
  • Angelica 2 years ago

    Thank you Dulce for speaking about this toxic femininity

    Reply
  • hypercube 2 years ago

    I’ve always felt “positive” stereotypes could be damaging. This reminded me of the Asian “Model Minority” myth. Let’s just not generalize.

    Reply
  • MsMookalate 2 years ago

    Thank you🙌👏🙌👏🙌

    Reply
  • JefbutmynameisnotJef 2 years ago

    The “Asians are smart” thing is very similar

    Reply
  • OfficeGossip 2 years ago

    Love this woman. Best guest on the show. Cant say much for the other guy unfortunately.

    Reply
  • Yoshua Martinez 2 years ago

    When I think Strong Black Woman, I think of every woman that has to deal with the bullshit of racism and sexism every fucking day. Having to deal with only one of those is exhausting, let alone both for your entire life. Every black woman deserves the automatic respect that they’ve earned through nonstop pain.
    It never occurred to me that dumbasses would actually assume that “strong black woman” only went as far as physically strong 🙄

    Reply
  • Yash Allimuthu 2 years ago

    Just call me! I will help you move baby!

    Reply
  • RVS_ musher 2 years ago

    So sad but so true.

    Reply
  • Traci Kennebrew 2 years ago

    …and mike drop! Thanks Dulce for summarizing what it really T I ******* is❗✔💯💓

    Reply
  • Autumn Bryant 2 years ago

    Thank you! I hate the “strong black woman” trope. I’m a fragile black woman and I deserve to be able to be that and have people treat me delicately and with care.

    Reply
  • Claudia 2 years ago

    Hi Dulce, thank you for shedding some light on this very important public health problem of overlooking black women’s health concerns. You’re the best.

    Reply
  • Joshua Reid 2 years ago

    THANK YOU!!! I dont really understand how we as a culture twisted this meaningful idea.

    Reply
  • Frostforus suh 2 years ago

    Love it!

    Reply
  • Autumn Bryant 2 years ago

    …and people just assume it too. I was so annoyed when this blonde lady I work with called me a “strong black woman” after she had known me for less than a week. Like, how would she know if I was at that point? We barely saw each other during that first week and she was doing it to try to get me to take on a task that I wouldn’t want to do and was a part of her job and not mine.

    Reply
  • Raistlin Majere 2 years ago

    Its kind of the same for white males we have to be seen as a strong sports loving heterosexual guy who doesn’t show emotion, and have a family by 30. Being skinny, over emotional about things and being asexual this idea or framework of a guy were standards I knew I would never reach. I don’t want to compare the issues black woman have with being a white male. But I can empathize with living with impossible standards leads to depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. There are times when being “weak” is a good thing in my opinion.

    Reply

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