Nicole Chung – “All You Can Ever Know” & The Challenges of Transracial Adoption | The Daily Show

141228

20 comments

  • Will Iam 3 years ago

    Yes, very interesting. I bet it was challengeing for her parents, who never questioned her race, and loved her, and raised her well.

    Reply
  • Will Iam 3 years ago

    It is a need of anyone from any race, to have a sense of identity. Even some caucaisian folks who are more than ‘just white’.

    Reply
  • M G 3 years ago

    Of course race is important in adoption.

    Reply
  • TenaciousC 3 years ago

    So “transracial” is now a thing.

    Reply
  • Jaiden Zheng 3 years ago

    I really recommend the book, if anyone has an interracial relationship in the family.

    Reply
  • Lucky & Blessed 3 years ago

    She’s so nervous….anyone else notice that???

    Reply
  • Keira Ungar 3 years ago

    I really need to get this book now after watching this. Just from this interview I can relate so much. I was adopted form China when I was sixteen months old by a white father and a Filipino mother. Before middle school I never really questioned race and stuff. From a young age my parents made it clear to me that I’m Chinese and even though my parents aren’t Chinese I’m their daughter no matter what race. I didn’t feel insecure or confused about my race until middle school. I’m now in eight grade and still very confused. The majority of my school is Asian and most are Korean. Everyone just has a deep pride of who they are including their race and for some reason I’m just so confused. How can I say I’m Chinese if no one in my family is Chinese except me. Can I say I’m half Filipino because my mom is Filipino and raise me on the Filipino culture she brought over form the Philippines to America. But if I say I’m half Filipino and half white then that means I’m just rejecting my whole Chinese culture. For a long time and still today in middle school I say that I’m just Filipino and half Chinese, but rlly I’m fully Chinese by blood and race but half Filipino because I was raised in a half Filipino household. I’m still pretty lost and don’t feel proud to say I’m Chinese anymore because of all these insecurities I have caused by the idea of race.

    Reply
  • prudentescent 3 years ago

    What an eye-opening and heartfelt story. I’m glad the Daily Show brought her in for an interview. I just hope that more of us can hear her story and others just like it. I’m definitely going to be picking up her book!

    Reply
  • greenspan11111 3 years ago

    WOW, She is literally a “Ching Chang Chong”!..

    Reply
  • Korie Kinchen 3 years ago

    Every adopted or Kidnap child yearns for it original parents.

    Reply
  • PixieAntix 3 years ago

    That’s weird… my brother and i were both adopted. Both hispanic they never held back. We discussed our heritage and my parents never felt the need to keep that from us. I dont understand why parents do this. I knew one kid who had brown skin and his parents were both white and they never told him he was adopted… how do you keep that a secret from your kids?

    Reply
  • Joseph M 3 years ago

    He’s a great interviewer, damn.

    Reply
  • Jon T 3 years ago

    If you were adopted you were one of the lucky ones, I heard that a lot of the kids who aren’t adopted have mental problems and can’t deal with life.

    Reply
  • CB 3 years ago

    Thank you so much for sharing this story! I am an adoptee myself, and I love to see some of our stories being shared more with the world. Transracial adoption is such a complex topic that I believe can often be misunderstood. Thank you, thank you! Her book was fantastic, too.

    Reply
  • Lainquest 3 years ago

    A friend of mine was adopted and we live in a very small village in a rural part of Germany. We never noticed she don’t look like her mother until another child asked her in 3rd grade about her adoption (her parents never told her until then). And after some crying about the adoption part, nobody cared anymore. Never occurred to me, that she looks different, because it was and still is so natural for us. Maybe it doesn’t matter, if you saw the person growing up within a small community. Btw she is Asian.

    Reply
  • USS Glow Cloud 3 years ago

    Has anyone seen “He Even Has Your Eyes”? It’s a French comedy about a (French) black couple who adopts a white baby.

    Reply
  • Sayan Nayak 3 years ago

    The Movie – LION (2016)
    Is exactly this !!

    Reply
  • Pamela Cass 3 years ago

    If even half the stories about adoption of Chinese children are true I can see where confusion comes in.

    We saw stories of girls being abandoned (too many children, boys being more valued because of their traditional familial duties), so people outside of China were willing to adopt, and China made money.

    Then the shit hit the fan: not enough girls to get married to, or even willing to get married and bear the brunt of familial duties. Housing and food prices going up, but salaries aren’t. And I would venture to say, no one has bothered to teach the young men who are the “center of the universe” to be respectful of the women willing even to discuss being with them, having their children, taking on the burden of familial duties for both sides of the families (especially if there’s only been 1 child in either family).

    What will China do when their population reaches 2 million?

    Reply
  • NerdyGal Art 3 years ago

    Omg it’s my girl!!!!!! ❤️❤️❤️ #adopteeson #mytribe Thank you NOAH for bringing her on!!!!! There are 1000s of us coming out speaking and I’m so happy someone is finally here. Love YOU Nicole!!!!!!!! ❤️???

    Reply
  • Prince Blake 3 years ago

    She won the lottery being adopted to loving white family (yes that matters) of high middle class status, who absolutely adored her. No child abuse or trauma. She’s married with a great career and by every reasonable metric, successful,and she still finds something to complain about and write a book. Ungrateful doesn’t even begin to describe this woman

    Reply

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published.