“How Can We Make This Right?” – Gayle King On Rectifying The Horrors Of The Tulsa Race Massacre

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Published on May 26, 2021

Gayle King was inspired seeing everybody take to the streets to protest the murder of George Floyd but she believes there is a lot more work to be done to turn that energy into actual change. She is also hosting a CBS News Special: “Tulsa 1921: An American Tragedy” which examines the horrors of the Tulsa Race Massacre. #Colbert #Tulsa1921 #GayleKing

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95 comments

  • Deangelo White White 1 year ago

    Gayle King was not selected by Black men to speak for us.

    Reply
  • King Alexander 1 year ago

    We are the young progressive American millennial generation and we will change our entire world for the better.
    🌏🇺🇸♥️

    Reply
  • Boonswangle B. Goodtimes 1 year ago

    It’s easy – but difficult – this is what we have to address, horrible moments of humanity failing itslef by lying to itself. Nothing is benefited from covering up our failings. They, for all human history, eventually come to light. How dumb can evil be? Yes, you can just be rancid and move on… hahah NO you can’t and we are going to be sure of that. It’s 2021, we are watching you, you privileged powerful cowards…. and guess what. We get to tell the stories going forward. Next step – a wall, a memorial for all the racists and bigots who thought they could skirt this – their names carved in stone – we can use it like modern gallows – throw rotten food at it and shoot roadkill out of t-shirt cannons to celebrate and acknowledge what they believed in, being satan incarnate. I mean how sad, to let hateful bigots go unknown. Write their names down ;D

    Reply
  • Mary Farrell 1 year ago

    Go back to bed Gayle!

    Reply
  • PS G 1 year ago

    Nothing will change, it’s a white country

    Reply
  • Timothy Tew 1 year ago

    I truly love strong smart women like Ms King. Bravo Gayle!

    Reply
  • meanderer121 1 year ago

    Blacks, whites, and ASIANS!

    Reply
  • SeMperfi Patriot 1 year ago

    *AKA JAIL KING* She’s been voted out by the black delegation way before Snoop dog got on her for that *insensitive interview she did about a yr ago with the darling Lisa Leslie about Kobe Bryant* [when she tried so hard for Lisa to talk shit bout Kobe on Live TV. She & her pal Oprah just Loves to throw black men under the bus, but has all these pics of her & Oprah at parties with Harvey Weinstein [me too movement] who hung with Jeffery Epstein. 

    Point is she’s fake and I will not give her any time of day 🤬🤬🤬

    Reply
  • SeMperfi Patriot 1 year ago

    *AKA JAIL KING* She’s been voted out by the black delegation way before Snoop dog got on her for that *insensitive interview she did about a yr ago with the darling Lisa Leslie about Kobe Bryant* [when she tried so hard for Lisa to talk shit bout Kobe on Live TV. She & her pal Oprah just *Loves* to throw black men under the bus, but has all these pics of her & Oprah at parties with Harvey Weinstein [me too movement] who hung with Jeffery Epstein. 

    Point is she’s fake and I will not give her any time of day 🤬🤬🤬

    Reply
  • Nika Nika 1 year ago

    Mrs King can talk all she wants be she contributes to the negative view of black men. Her and Opera are quick to demonize or criticize black men for their mistakes, but would never address the white men who are worse like Epstein. I will never forgive her for disrespecting Kobe Bryant’s name in death. No compassion or understanding. Just the story. Can’t stand her and opera.

    Reply
  • subject_17 1 year ago

    Ah yes Jail King

    Reply
  • Jis Yang 1 year ago

    The fact that Tulsa race massacre hasn’t been widely known is living proof of broad whitewashing of US history. Shameful.

    Reply
  • The End Begins 1 year ago

    Cincinnati Oh little Africa.

    Reply
  • ProjectFlashlight612 1 year ago

    Remember back when people had the time and lack of plague problems to obsess over whether King was Oprah Winfrey’s lover?

    Reply
  • Adrian Mills 1 year ago

    As a European I was absolutely astounded to hear of the Tulsa massacre just a few years ago. It’s absolutely a shameful stain on US history and some effort needs to be put into to helping address it, and not some trivial token effort either.

    Reply
  • RainyDayLady 1 year ago

    It’s too bad that the Tulsa story is being shown at 10pm. I hope some parents will let their kids stay up to watch it. This should.be talked about in every classroom. I learned about it while reading about Madam Walker in one of the books about her. That was only two years ago and I’m 67. There is so much history that is being censored.

    Reply
  • vegan skeptic 1 year ago

    Some of the racist perpetrators actually kept souvenirs of what happened in the form of photos that documented the atrocities.

    Reply
  • Kenster 1 year ago

    One thing that would help with not only racial reconsiliation but also in combatting the recent rise in anti-democratic and anti-factual movements is investing is QUALITY EDUCATION. In some respects, the US education system is at the same level as developing countries, while Europe, Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan and New Zealand are way ahead when it comes to equipping their kids and teens intellectually to make sound reasonable decisions as adults.

    Reply
  • Martin Smith 1 year ago

    I don’t think people really understand how deeply rooted hatred is in this country. Now that it’s being uncovered, people no longer have to hide it. They can just openly spew it. They say sunlight is the best disinfectant. I’m not so sure.

    Reply
  • Sparks 1 year ago

    I had heard of this Tulsa tragedy before. It’s something you have to dig up since it’s not taught in schools as American history. But I do have to say,… other than acknowledging the racism and the horror of the event,… there isn’t much to do about it. It’s done,… learning about it helps,… but that’s it. What we really need is a better educational system that teaches kids the real history and what to avoid so we don’t repeat the same mistakes. Racism is a problem of ignorance on all sides. Entitlement all over the world,… not just in white America.

    Reply
  • LASHK001 1 year ago

    Compensate the Tulsa families for the losses of their homes and businesses. The insurance companies never paid out a dime after the destruction and massacre. All the words and remembrances are hollow if the families aren’t restored.

    Reply
  • Samantha Marie Freeman 1 year ago

    Re: Tulsa slaughter, remember that the Greenwood community was a 30 year township. Those folks had been there for 30 years, working, building and creating a large community of 600 plus professional businesses.

    Reply
  • ciaociao P 1 year ago

    Still Asians are neglected in this subject.

    Reply
  • Vail Ryan 1 year ago

    You sure Tim Scott’s not there to water down any legislation?
    We all heard what he said.

    Reply
  • laurie rotavarp 1 year ago

    I as a 67 year old I can’t believe I am just learning about Tulsa now.

    Reply
  • Alex Rice 1 year ago

    In public school in Oregon, this event was never taught.

    Reply
  • Lae Lae 1 year ago

    Let her call OPRAH… bye Gayle! #phony

    Reply
  • P A 1 year ago

    The Tulsa race massacre (known alternatively as the Tulsa race riot, the Greenwood Massacre, the Black Wall Street Massacre, the Tulsa pogrom, or the Tulsa Massacre) took place on May 31 and June 1, 1921, when mobs of White residents, many of them deputized and given weapons by city officials, attacked Black residents and businesses of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma.It has been called “the single worst incident of racial violence in American history”.[17] The attack, carried out on the ground and from private aircraft, destroyed more than 35 square blocks of the district—at that time the wealthiest Black community in the United States, known as “Black Wall Street”. More than 800 people were admitted to hospitals, and as many as 6,000 Black residents were interned in large facilities, many of them for several days.[19][20] The Oklahoma Bureau of Vital Statistics officially recorded 36 dead. A 2001 state commission examination of events was able to confirm 39 dead, 26 Black and 13 White, based on contemporary autopsy reports, death certificates and other records.The commission gave several estimates ranging from 75 to 300 dead.

    Reply
  • DrownedInExile 1 year ago

    The only bright side I can see to the Tulsa Pogrom, is that people are more aware of it now. 100 years of silence is almost broken.

    Reply
  • Doug Horton 1 year ago

    People will be kicking themselves in few weeks if they miss the opportunity to buy and invest in Crypto

    Reply
  • Andrew Blade 1 year ago

    One bad cop does not mean all of policing is rotten. Chauvin was charged and convicted…moving on. Cops are overwhelmingly good decent people. Ask Brandon Tatum.

    Reply
  • Chrissie Bawn 1 year ago

    Remember Rodney King’s words! This has to STOP! EVERYWHERE!

    God Bless you Gayle and Stephen!

    All! ❤🙏🕊🌍🖖

    Reply
  • Yvonne Lipson 1 year ago

    I grew up 20 miles from Tulsa, took OK history in high school and never heard a word about it until a year ago.

    Reply
  • kassia pencek 1 year ago

    Yep I didn’t know about this 20 years ago as well. Insanity.

    Reply
  • J Whit 1 year ago

    If the City of Richmond Virginia removed confederate statues off their beloved Monument Avenue? Anything is possible. Have hope.

    Reply
  • John Brown 1 year ago

    There is a name for all of those “riots” it was ethnic cleansing

    Reply
  • Jake Baker 1 year ago

    Even today there is lots of oppressions that is not talked about, but known of with devastating implications on everyone for generations to come.

    Reply
  • Andrew Scotton 1 year ago

    Slavery, colonialism, lynchings, global warming…If western society was a person in a good society, we would be doing life in a supermax prison!

    Reply
  • Arctic Haze 1 year ago

    Hatred and jealousy. The same thing that fueled the Jew persecution in Nazi Germany.

    Reply
  • William Bent 1 year ago

    For an excellent eyewitness account of this massacre, sadly just one of many, latest Smithsonian article. It has maps of Greenwood, with indication whether business or home and destroyed or not–and how many of the black residents never came back home.

    Reply
  • wily wascal 1 year ago

    Had first learned several decades ago of Greenwood, Oklahoma and the brutal massacre of Blacks and wanton, wholescale destruction of their homes and businesses in 1921. Occasionally, have see references to it through various media. But this historically significant event has never been part of the traditional curriculum in public schools to my knowledge, and that needs to change. Once the pictures have been seen, the stories of survivors heard, and the understanding learned of what happened, it—-like the Holocaust—-is unforgettable. Then, like the Holocaust and other such atrocities, we will be better able to committing to never again letting such mindless hatred running amok to harm and kill so many innocent people. The mandatory inclusion of this sordid event in our school’s history curriculum should be the first, most basic step in achieving some justice and reparations for the people of Greenwood and their survivors, and would benefit all Blacks and other minorities in this country going forward by helping to end systemic racism and racial injustice.

    Reply
  • Marvin Gershowitz 1 year ago

    1st we screwed the Tribes in America and then we nearly killed them all
    2nd we freed the slaves and promised them the dream of self preservation with a farm and some seed money to help them become citizens in this world we took…. WE LIED.
    3rd we owe the disadvantage the same success whether mother and father succeeded with their lives or not. This should not be GENERATIONAL for our COUNTRY TO GROW STRONG means using our most important resource with all the OPPORTUNITY to Succeed whether or not those before them were successful… EVERYTHING HAS VALUE! and so are people valuable…, everyone! – m.

    Reply
  • Marvin Gershowitz 1 year ago

    The KILLING of George Floyd is no different than the Attack on Jan 6th at the Capital. Any citizen that are attacked by Prejudice and Bigotry are attacking every American. Profit Prisons are made For Profit and not for the Nations need and are Profit centers based on the INEQUALITY of People and their Poverty. Don’t bet on Justice!

    Reply
  • Bat Boy 1 year ago

    Many liberals think they can defeat implicit bias, (which they incorrectly believe is racism), with real racism of their own.

    “We must believe in a future where color of skin is no more significant than color of hair” – Sam Harris

    Reply
  • wily wascal 1 year ago

    The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now
    Tulsa Public Schools — Jun 1, 2018
    (NOTE: Contains link in description to more information updated April 2021)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhoAGJUDEvc

    Reply
  • William Vannorman 1 year ago

    black people always have hope for change that is how we have survived in America but in order to live in America we need understanding of our history .

    Reply
  • kilhoffa 1 year ago

    Public schools in OKC has been teaching it since at least 2001 because I remember learning about it in Oklahoma history class. Definitely needs to be taught nationally, but it is taught in some places.

    Reply
  • Ona Ari 1 year ago

    It is reasonable for a grandmother to request to be in the delivery room, but it is reasonable for a woman who is giving birth to say no.
    She is going to be naked, possibly vomiting, pooping while in severe pain. The woman in labor might to limit the people who could whiteness her in that condition. I know from experience that even the most minor stress increases the pain exponentially.

    Reply
  • Tiffany Anderson 1 year ago

    It’s important to mention this massacre was also the first & only time a city was firebombed. The depravity in this country…

    Reply
  • Amanda Dougherty 1 year ago

    I was born and raised in Oklahoma and had to take Oklahoma history as a condition to graduate high school. It wasn’t until I attended law school in Philadelphia that I was taught about the Tulsa Race Massacre. I am still furious that this wasn’t taught in schools, and I had to go a thousand miles away to hear about it.

    Reply
  • Ananta Androscoggin 1 year ago

    Murdering Black Citizens seems to be a Blue Race job perk.

    Reply
  • Jeff1961 1 year ago

    US Capitol Arrests: Richard Barnett INDICTED https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKsE_EOcz1w

    Reply
  • Fauler Perfektionist 1 year ago

    I’ve been reading _Brown v. Board of Education_ by James T. Patterson. He has pointed to this period in US history, _decades_ long, with laws put in place to ethnically integrate one school district or another that have been followed by what history has dubbed “white flight.” Basically, white parents with their kids in schools with student bodies that were entirely white before hand, suddenly having to accept black students, subsequently moving their families to _different_ school districts, or _private_ schools.
    And it hasn’t just been in the south, either. The trial that _started_ this, from which the book takes its title, is a northern state, but immediately, it went to state after state in the south and this trend took place, but when they started doing this in _northern_ states, this trend continued, and it’s _so_ goddamn embarrassing.
    What’s so terrifying about having students with a different ethnic group coming to the same school with you?

    Reply
  • tedviens1 1 year ago

    When a force trains for WAR, that force will find WAR wherever it looks. And, dammit, when one trains for WAR and finds oneself in the moment of WAR, that is the most intense and satisfying fun that one will ever experience. If one thinks that the trauma and sorrow that another finds in discovering that they have murdered an innocent child erases the intensely pleasurable experience that this person has at the moment they are pulling the trigger and unwittingly murdering that innocent child, one is only preparing for the murders of more innocent children. Throughout our United States, by indoctrinating our Police Officers with Warrior Style Police Training, we, as a nation, are spending a billion dollars a year perverting our Police Officers into Soldiers and training them for WAR.

    Reply
  • tedviens1 1 year ago

    The modern US police training often offers official classes in “Warrior Style Police Training,” based on seeing every subject response as a lethal “I feared for my life!!” fear-mongered response that demands a maximum kill or be killed savage warfare soldier response. Hours are spent in this official training in the maximum use of frenzy and gunfire in this officially trained response. It is a marketed official US police training that is easily and well-executed by Police Officers in the field. So… members of the press, start telling the damn truth.

    Reply
  • Col William NOYDB 1 year ago

    I went my last year of high school in Tulsa, 1983. Went to University Of Tulsa. I knew about it then. Some people who claim to have never heard about it back then had their head in a hole. There was a black attorney who lived in that part of town who said he never heard about it. That, I seriously doubt.

    Reply
  • chinookvalley 1 year ago

    Until we humans learn to treat ALL life with respect we will be a sick and twisted species. Animals are beaten and abused and it’s accepted. The Earth is being murdered by our own species and we don’t see a problem. We have to start teaching our children that it isn’t right to injure other life forms. Or not…

    Reply
  • Zizi Roberts 1 year ago

    Justice for all.
    It’s what has always been at stake.

    Reply
  • Leroy Ashley 1 year ago

    Can one white person be true to themselves and let the world know why a black person is the most hated living soul on this planet to white people? Why do white people make other nationalities adopt their ways when it comes to having a relationship with black people? Why can’t white people get out of way of black growth? I know that there is light and there is dark, there is night and then there is day, there is love and then there is hate. Which one of these two feelings each nationality project towards more? Who is the most God fearing of the two? Which one of the two can forgive, or have forgiveness in their heart? Which one needs forgiven?

    Reply
  • chinookvalley 1 year ago

    W and Gayle Norton wrote more worthless treaties to provide reparations to African Americans (HR40), and the INDIAN TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS. These were written and accepted in good faith, but alas, as the whites are known for doing, nothing transpired. Descendants and survivors were promised land, financial resources, a way to rebuild their peoples’ society and existence, a step toward repaying these people for the damages done by – the whites. More lies, more false hope, more dancing to avoid ever giving these people what they are owed. How much money has our government $pent – in order to NOT provide what was promised?

    Reply
  • chinookvalley 1 year ago

    I live in a rural town in Colorado and the school here actually took magic markers to the textbooks and marked out what they didn’t want the children to see. Hatred is alive and well, and history is being stomped to death. Education is where people learn their morals, and it is passed down generation to generation.

    Reply
  • Sarah Robison 1 year ago

    My parents lived in Tulsa while I was in college and I visited there a lot on breaks. I even worked at the Tulsa offices of a democratic congressman the summer after I graduated. Never heard one thing about the Tulsa massacre until they covered it on My Favorite Murder. History should not be censored like this.

    Reply
  • Bob Hildebrand 1 year ago

    This is a sick World because there are too many sick people.

    Reply
  • Chia_Pet 1 year ago

    Just think, none of y’all would be talking if that guy at CUP Foods didn’t call the police on George Floyd.

    Reply
  • Alexa Trinidad 1 year ago

    The aware syrup covalently steer because open initially disarm inside a laughable trombone. hoc, young shallot

    Reply
  • Honkytonkified 1 year ago

    How? Just try. Accountability for crooked policemen. Outlaw extra judiciary conduct immediately. This would immediately end most racial abuse. Get honest Republicans on Capitol Hill and get to work.

    Reply
  • Kat B 1 year ago

    I have nothing nice to say here.

    Reply
  • George Carlin 1 year ago

    Nobody gives a shit…..

    Reply
  • J0einOK 1 year ago

    I bet they don’t cover the lead-up of fear of Black WW I vets coming back trained and the social acceptance of the Klan at that time. Mayor Brady ran as a Klan member, and the guys with the airplanes dropping the home-made fire bombs likely were, too. There was never even an official body count as far as I know.

    Reply
  • H Soko 1 year ago

    Check out a bizzare photo online with Gayle King, Tom Hanks with a black eye (look up meaning of the black eye) with a very strange clock in the back with hot dogs…Symbols is their secret world….Symbols will be their downfall.

    Reply
  • Joseph Q 1 year ago

    💜2021✨Amen pass the Word
    #MillenniumLanceAndTheOpenScroll 🌹
    Daniel 11-12 Revelation 20-21
    🙏keeping the Faith💜

    Reply
  • Joseph Q 1 year ago

    💜2021✨Amén pasa la Palabra
    #MillenniumLanceAndTheOpenScroll 🌹
    Daniel 11-12 Apocalipsis 20-21
    🙏manteniendo la Fe….💜

    Reply
  • Alexa Trinidad 1 year ago

    The ultra pain really repeat because eggplant oddly undress outside a sturdy quiet. pastoral, sad direction

    Reply
  • Audrey Wellham 1 year ago

    It’s so wrong we never get taught this incredible history and destruction for no reason at all. Horrendous.

    Reply
  • MariYah Israel 1 year ago

    Gayle King: “We still have a lot of work to do.”
    And everytime we bring up the conversation about murdering Black people or the theft of Black money and wealth … the racist change the subject or deflect onto something they care about – bc they don’t give a chyt about Black people.

    Reply
  • Savannah M. Laurentian 1 year ago

    Make it right when you make right the Sand Creek massacre, Trail of Tears, stealing of children shipped to their deaths in assimilation schools and genocide of the indigenous people of THIS continent.

    Reply
  • Adam Hull 1 year ago

    Born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I was lucky enough to have an excellent history teacher named Mr. Miller who taught us about the race riot (as it was called then)

    I do want to correct something that was said in this segment as if it were fact though. Stephen says that “at lest 300 were killed” which is untrue. The truth is that we don’t know how many people were killed. In 2001 a bipartisan state commission gave an estimate of 75-300 but could only confirm 39 (26 blacks and 13 whites.) I think it’s important to make sure we are speaking correctly when talking about something this serious as it’s horrifying enough and exaggeration only serves to weaken the story.

    Reply
  • Adam Hull 1 year ago

    Here are a few facts about the massacre that I find comforting despite happening within such a horrible situation…

    1) The Tulsa Police Chief addressed both crowds in front of the courthouse. He informed the white mob that there would absolutely be no lynching so long as he was in charge and informed the black mob that he did not need their assistance and that they should go home as Dick Rowland was not under arrest but in protective custody.

    2) When the white mob tried to loot a military outpost of its weapons the commanding officer informed them that anyone who crossed its threshold would be shot dead, no questions asked.

    I think this goes to show that there have always been good people willing to go against the “mob rule” and do what is right.

    Reply
  • Snowy Tyler 1 year ago

    I had never heard of this massacre until this summer. In our English class I assigned it for a research project to my juniors in conjunction with reading Born a Crime, which draws comparisons with the way America’s history of racism echoes South Africa’s system of apartheid. I used a survey to discover what they already knew (being an English teacher I wasn’t too sure what they’d learned in history class) and we hit the topic of how racism affected and continues to affect this country through that topic, the Birmingham Chirch Bombing, Jim Crow, the Trail of Tears, the internment camps of Japanese American citizens and incredible African American heroes from Harriet Tubman to Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass. It was a start. And the students were so interested in learning what really happened in our country. It matters to all of us.

    Reply
  • brett comstock 1 year ago

    That’s right. People are ignorant of the massacre. Even in Tulsa. I have deep roots in Tulsa, an I NEVER knew about it myself. I only learned about it through my own research. Even then, my introduction to the story was labeled with a headline referring to the “Tulsa Race Riots”. Of course, painting it as a riot, instead of the massacre that it actually was, shows how the attempt to “sanitize” the re-telling of the story was already well-underway.

    Reply
  • Manwolf 1 year ago

    In Oklahoma, important history is shelved and forgotten like the white walkers in GOT.

    Reply
  • Y 1 year ago

    Side note: her makeup is really good here

    Reply
  • Chase Morissette 1 year ago

    Ever hear of the movie Rosewood with Ving Rhames kicking ass?

    Reply
  • Chase Morissette 1 year ago

    I heard black Jesus got rejected by black Americans cause they found out he was white, otherwise known as Jewish.

    Reply
  • Judith MacFadzen 1 year ago

    Hey Gayle, how is your relationship with the Sussex family going? 🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Reply
  • steve mann 1 year ago

    How about Gee-gee

    Reply
  • Flaxen D L Conway 1 year ago

    ,

    Reply
  • Navarro Torres 1 year ago

    My advice to everyone is to invest in cryptocurrencies especially Bitcoin it might hit $70k soon
    Buy crypto and silver now Bitcion will definitely hit $70,000

    Reply
  • Jennifer Hizzy 1 year ago

    No one ever paid for the crime of slavery either. grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

    Reply
  • notinmanitou 1 year ago

    I’m 65 and learned of this massacre in the recent issue of Smithsonian Magazine. I am amazed that they buried this so deep!

    Reply
  • Nicholi 1 year ago

    Missed opportunity to talk about reparations… And it was by design… To quickly end the conversation

    Reply
  • TK Wallace 1 year ago

    ::thinking:: I understand that the central crime of American history is slavery and how, overwhelmingly, there are two threads of that legacy that make their way, Black and White. But, in 2020 and 2021, when Gayle talks about “both Black and White” people protested George Floyd’s murder (or how two Black congressmen, Republican and Democrat, are pushing the Justice in Policing bill forward)… there are a lot of Americans that are not Black or White who have fully participated in these events.

    I don’t want it highlighted, but I don’t want it left out, and I DON’T know how to talk about it, but I do know that when we fail to mention, people assume there’s no one there.

    It’s the movie set meme from “Psych”: Dulé Hill’s character asks why there aren’t any Black people, an actor replies that it’s set in Victorian-era England, and Hill’s character replies something to the effect of “And Black people hadn’t been invented by 1898?” FTR, free Black people were living in England at least as early as 1501 – the 2018 Wolfson History Prize shortlist nominee “Black Tudors” details the lives of 10 Black men and women of Tudor and Stewart England. And THAT’s important, too. These people didn’t live in some isolated enclave that happened to be on the island some other people called “England” – we know about them because they were fully part of Tudor society, their births/marriages/children’s births/wages/taxes/deaths were recorded in the legal records the same as their neighbors, even if they were minorities *within* that society. Both are simultaneously and equally true.

    TL;DR: Going forward, we need to figure out a way to talk about the priority or most prominent participants in events of American history going forward, without inadvertently erasing smaller groups who equally participated as they were equally American.

    Reply
  • Oscar Warren 1 year ago

    GAIL is still fine…..

    Reply
  • Chi Obialo 1 year ago

    The people against teaching America racist history to students, will soon start advocating that the public not have access to view police body-cam footage or even ban police from having body-cam. “There is no need to study any history; especially one that makes you feel bad.” They will say.

    Reply

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