Emmanuel Acho: Being Anti-Racist Means Calling Out Racism Wherever You See It

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Published on June 10, 2020

Sports Analyst, former NFL athlete and host of “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man,” Emmanuel Acho, tells Stephen Colbert that being truly anti-racist means speaking out whenever racism occurs, without hesitation. Watch Acho’s new show at http://www.uncomfortableconvos.com. #StephenAtHome #EmmanuelAcho #UncomfortableConversations

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18 comments

  • laalaa99stl 2 years ago

    Matthew McConaughey on racism: allwrong allwrong allwrong.

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  • laalaa99stl 2 years ago

    I can’t wait to see Roger Goodell holding hands with Colin Kaepernick and taking a knee together. Yeah, Goodall would still be a huge ass phony. But you just know there would be a racist little orange man, hiding in a bunker, completely losing his shit over the gesture.

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  • Philosopher of Nonsense 2 years ago

    Wow, 2nd…

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  • Last first 2 years ago

    Fourth!! #fuqracism

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  • 🍯 blood honey 2 years ago

    What??

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  • Ene Obande 2 years ago

    Handsome and smart

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  • Emily Tang 2 years ago

    Good on Acho for starting the show. Better to put everything on the table (whether it’s comfortable or not) and discuss them than to just brush it off, ignore it, or being naive about it.

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  • Rev. Robin Kay Monk Self 2 years ago

    Loving the interviews! However… Can we get some of the many Black women working the frontlines?

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  • New Message 2 years ago

    He’s gotta be so sick of people saying “Gesundheit” every time he says his name.

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  • New Message 2 years ago

    When the pandemic is over, we need a video of that man hugging the crap out of Linda.

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  • Mark Callaghan 2 years ago

    I call out my family members casual racism all the time, to zero practical effect

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  • Adam Stray 2 years ago

    Was just think this

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  • Brian Hack 2 years ago

    While I understand the intention of “anti-racist” as working to undo racism, the problem I see with “anti-” is that it is simply opposite (in addition to against), meaning that “anti-racism” is still racism. What is labeled as “not racist” by whites is very likely what Emmanuel wants: to not judge people on their race or color of skin. However, the difference is that the focus is always on us needing to change instead of just asking maybe the change is in our attitudes. Without knowing, case-by-case, if it is the white’s attitude or the black’s attitude. There are things that black people want to do that whites tend to be prevalent in yet, the reverse also occurs as well.

    If two people are in a bitter discussion in public, I will hang around if need-be to intervene. If they are strangers, I will be more likely to do that whereas I am not so likely to do that if they appear to know each other. Case-by-case and whether or not I am up to it or not, or even if I could find a way to justify my intervention if need-be. Pretty much, I see it as being a life-guard saving a drowning person: never immediately jump in; find a way to help, but also recognize that perhaps they are not drowning but just acting like a jerk (probably not the case but could be 1% of the time?).

    An easier example is that I have different things I do with people, regardless of language or appearance, than animals. Yet we are all animals. But I cannot hope to communicate with an “animal” such as a cat or dog or coyote. So if I see two animals at night and then one catches up and I hear a bad sound, I am likely not to investigate whereas I would call the cops or go check myself to make sure everyone is okay. I live in an area where coyotes are present as well as stray cats, more so than stray dogs. All four of us (cats, dogs, coyotes, humans) are animals, yet I do different things depending on how likely the threat is to me as well as the ability to communicate. If someone speaks Chinese, Arabic, French, or English, I will likely react differently but usually we all will be able to speak English or use gestures if we are in America. And I will not approach people unless I know them and have interacted with them: Arabs have particular customs even if they are naturalized or several-generation American; blacks could be discussing business and making money, sports, or anime; whites are likely cowering in a corner somewhere because… well… we are always bound to piss off someone.

    Is every part of America anti-racist? Probably not. Is it better than 20 or 40 or 100 years ago? Most likely.

    One last thing, is that white males commit suicide more than any other demographic. Males are about three times more likely than female. So sure, what you may see about whites is “white privilege” but although I could agree with you… I do see and feel that whites have a lot to deal with silently and thus are more likely to be able to listen to everyone more than just their own community or those who look like them. More likely to commit suicide because of being white or male is not exactly what I would think of as a privilege anyone wants. Yet also, I do enjoy being extremely compassionate even if it leads me down roads of silent struggle.

    Case-in-point: How likely are you to accept the George Floyd protests if it were Martin Gugino? And people went around saying “White Lives Matter” in order to spread awareness of police brutality? …Most likely, if I asked you that last month, you would call me a white supremacist. And yet I see myself as an equalist that happens to be white.

    “Equality for All, not just the vocal.”
    “It takes more courage to defend something I hate, than to provoke someone I love.”

    Both are quotes of myself, whoever I am, because I think they are something we can all agree on if we were in a civil discourse about the best solution for all.

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  • SinisterAF 2 years ago

    “My message to my white brothers and sisters, was to *expose yourselves* “ #Protestflashing

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  • Anoid Roudrigez 2 years ago

    I have tried to have this conversation with white people before, it makes them feel uncomfortable. Why I will understanding but I’m starting to get the idea. The fact that white people would be more outraged by a dog dying or a removal of a statue that symbolized racism does not surprise me one bit. For those white people out of their own little bubble thank you. Asking questions, understanding why racism is problem, asking a black what is like to be black is all it takes to be educated. Until white people manage to have these so called ‘uncomfortable’ conversations nothing will change.

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  • Linden NZ 2 years ago

    Is that true that it is common for families in the U.S. not to talk about race or racism? If so then WOW, no wonder you have so many problems.

    Reply

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